An old family genealogy, researched by Lilian G. Polk (18 Jun 1901 - 18 Feb 1984), who writes that Jacob Clark died in Smithfield, Jefferson Co., Ohio in 1841 (Pittsburgh Junction).  The same notebook states that his wife Tabitha Dennis Clark died in 1844 at the home of their son, John D. Clark, in Washington D.C.  This information came from a letter written by Jacob's grandson, John T.C. Clark, in 1882, and earlier this year, I was able to obtain a newspaper article from the Baltimore Sun, stating her obituary as "Tabitha Clark, died 03 Jul 1843, at the home of her son, John D. Clark, Washington D.C."  This obituary had been previously undiscovered by the early family genealogy researchers, but certainly proves what had been written by the grandchildren in the mid to late 1800's as being very accurate.

"Master of Doro, an Epic of the Old South" by Annie Clark Jacobs and “Reminiscences of a Mississippian in Peace and War”, by Col. Frank Alexander Montgomery are two published books that both refer to Jacob in the Revolutionary War, enlisting from Maryland, and later moving the family into Ohio.

In the publication “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Jefferson County, Ohio” by Charles F. Green, published March 4, 1999 it lists "Jacob Clark born 1754, served in Maryland Continental Line."

The History of Noble County Ohio, L. H. Watkins, 1877, in the chapter entitled, Territorial Government and Public Lands ,Page 49 ,

It talks about early settlers in Ohio, and specifically mentions Jefferson Co. Ohio. On June 15, 1785, Congress circulated a petition to get these settlers out of the territory and also discourage new settlers from coming until the land was surveyed, etc..  It lists the "Intruders" and on the list is our Jacob Clark and his brother James Clark.

"The Pathfinders of Jefferson County" compiled by W. H. Hunter, published in the History of Ohio, Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Vol 6, page137, also states that both Jacob Clark and his brother James were early settlers of Jefferson Co., Ohio, true Ohio Pioneers. 
Other early researchersof the Jacob Clark family were Madel Jacobs Stringer, Francis Irwin Berry, James Bellarts and Stella Farrar Langdon.  Last year, I took over much of their early research, and have added to it considerably.  I have also gathered about 20 living descendants, from all over the US, and we have formed an family information email group. 

Submitted by chapter member, Wilma Clark
2007

Emma Stewart Clark Lenoir Cooper daughter of Charles and Anna Eliza Darden Clark
Donated by Wilma Clark

Annie Eliza Clark and husband George Rixneer Jacobs
Photos donated by descendant, WIlma Clark

Annie Eliza Clark Jacobs daughter of Charles and Ann Eliza Darden Clark
Donated by Wilma Clark

Wilma Clark contact information
wilmaclark@earthlink.net


Jacob Clark - SAR Graveside dedication held May 17, 2008
REHOBOTH PIONEER CEMETERY, Smithfield Twp., Jefferson County, Ohio
Bronze marker for J. Clark was installed by the SAR, Ebenezer Zane Chapter, St. Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio
Remarks on behalf of the Clark family were read by Chapter President, Flora L. VerStraten as requested by Wilma Clark
[Service also held for Joseph Chambers on May 17, 2008, same location]

The following was compiled by Wilma J. Clark
wilmaclark@embarqmail.com

Jacob Nicholls Clark - Revolutionary War Soldier

When the Revolutionary War began, the Americans did not have a professional army or navy. Each colony provided for its own defenses through the use of local militia. 14 June 1775, Congress voted to appoint Congressman George Washington, of Virginia, as commanding general of the colonial forces, organizing the Continental Army.

Jacob Nicholls Clark, born 13 October 1754, followed his brother James Clark into military service in the Revolutionary War in January of 1776. James enlisted from Baltimore, Maryland in 1775, and Jacob enlisted there also, under Captain Samuel Smith in the First Regiment of the Maryland Line, which was commanded by Colonel William Smallwood.1

Jacob’s Regiment marched from Baltimore, through Pennsylvania and New Jersey to American Army Headquarters in New York City. 27 August 1776 he fought in the Battle of Long Island, which was commanded by Lord Sterling, and then retreated with the troops to Fort Washington, York Island, New York.

The British and Hessians attacked Fort Washington 16 November 1776, overpowering the Continental Army, and forcing a surrender of Fort Washington to the Hessians. Jacob and other surviving American soldiers fled across the Hudson River to Fort Lee, New Jersey, only to find that Fort Lee had also been captured 20 November 1776.

After these defeats, the Continental Army was exhausted, demoralized and uncertain of its future. It was a cold winter and many of the soldiers were now walking barefoot in the snow, leaving trails of blood. Believing that the need to raise the hopes and spirits of the troops and people was imperative, General George Washington, Commander in Chief, ordered a massive surprise attack on the Hessian held city of Trenton, New Jersey.

Jacob Clark was with General George Washington on 25 December 1776 when the troops crossed the treacherous ice-swollen Delaware River about 9 miles north of Trenton, New Jersey. Raging winds combined with snow, sleet and rain on the night of December 25 was but one of many hardships endured by these brave soldiers throughout our country’s first battle for independence. Remarkably, the following day, Colonel Smallwood’s First Maryland Regiment marched into the Battle of Trenton under the command of Major General Nathaniel Greene, 26 December 1776,2 and Jacob was once again engaged in battle. Trenton was declared a victory for the Continental Army when the Hessians surrendered the city.

Jacob now entered into what became known as the Philadelphia Campaign of 1777, a turning point in the American Revolution. The British won all the major battles, yet they were unable to suppress the rebellion. This Campaign began with the landing of the enemy at Head of Elk, Maryland and ended with Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The British plan was to seize the then capital city of Philadelphia. 25 August 1777 a 265-ship armada, under the command of General William Howe, arrived at Head of Elk with 13,000 British and 5,000 Hessian troops.3 Generals Washington, Greene and LaFayette viewed the troops disembarking from their vantage point on Iron Hill, which overlooked the Head of Elk. Jacob was assigned to guard the baggage train and although he was not engaged in battle, he participated in the orderly retreat into Chester County, Pennsylvania when it was determined that the Continental Army was significantly out-numbered and that victory was unattainable.

General Washington rapidly moved his troops between General Howe’s Army and the city of Philadelphia and prepared to fight what would be one of the largest and bloodiest battles in the war. By the night of September 10th, the American troops were extended along a six-mile line on the east side of Brandywine Creek. Washington knew that the British army would have to cross the creek here in order to advance to Philadelphia. The Battle of Brandywine was fought 11 September 1777, and while the Continental Army fought valiantly, the British attack was overwhelming, and the Americans were forced to retreat once again.

After their defeat at the Battle of Brandywine, the Continental Army in order to regroup, marched about 10 miles north of Brandywine and set up camp. When General Howe learned of their position, he moved his troops toward them in order to encounter a second skirmish with the Americans. 16 September 1777 General Washington and General Howe, waited on opposite sides of the valley to engage in battle, but before a shot was fired, a tremendous cloudburst with torrential downpours of rain, forced both armies to leave the field and wait to fight another day.

The cartridges and powder of the Continental Army were completely ruined leaving them in a precarious position. For safety, and to replenish ammunition, General Washington ordered all of his troops to the Warwick Furnace, an early ironworks community located in Chester County, Pennsylvania 17 September 1777.4 Here, Jacob N. Clark met his future wife, Tabitha Dennis, the daughter of accountant, John Dennis, who worked for the Warwick Furnace. 5

Jacob marched on toward Philadelphia as part of an exhausted Army and their next encounter was the Battle of Germantown. 4 October 1777, Jacob raised his rifle in battle, aimed, “taking sight of one of those poor fellows in the British service.” 6 However, before he could fire, Jacob was himself struck in the forehead by a spent musket ball. The ball penetrated his skull, entering just above his right eye. The Continental Army retreated back to Perkiomen Creek, traveling through Flourtown, Pennsylvania, taking their wounded into the Episcopalian Church, used as their hospital.7 It was likely here, that an army surgeon performed the trepanning operation to remove the crushed portion of his skull. A silver plate was then inserted over the wound, and Jacob forever after wore a scarf around his head to protect his injury.

In his pension deposition, Jacob states that afterwards he was at the Perkiomen Creek encampment at Pennypacker’s Mills, just outside Germantown. Today a stone marker commemorates Washington’s encampment here and reads as follows:

THIS STONE MARKS THE CAMP OF WASHINGTON’S ARMY, PENNYPACKER’S MILLS. SEPT. 26-29 & OCT. 5-8, 1777
Historical Society of Montgomery Co., PA 8 Oct. 1897.

Also in his deposition, Jacob states that he remained under the command of General George Washington and was with his army during the winter of 1777. Washington’s troops were secluded at Valley Forge, an ironworks owned by Isaac Potts, and located fifteen miles south east of the Warwick Furnace, which was owned by his father, John Potts. Jacob’s name is not included on the Muster Roll at Valley Forge, which can be explained by the fact that General William Smallwood’s troops were, at this time, ordered to Wilmington, Delaware to protect against enemy movements in the Delaware Bay. Jacob would have been recovering from his critical head injury and likely would not have been moved out with them. He was still technically under the command of General Smallwood and therefore would not have been listed as a soldier on the roll with their regiment, as Smallwood’s army did not remain at Valley Forge. Family letters, between the grandchildren, state that Jacob often told his family of hearing General Washington go out each morning during that cold winter at Valley Forge “praying to the Almighty to deliver them from their enemies.” 8

After Jacob recovered, he was placed in the company of Lieutenant Jacob Norris to act as a recruiting agent for the Army traveling into Hampton County Maryland. In the spring of 1778, General Washington vehemently opposed British Prime Minister, Frederick Lord North’s, new proposal to negotiate peace with the Americans and all recruiting parties were then summoned back to Germantown, Pennsylvania to organize their next maneuvers against the enemy.

Upon his return, Jacob engaged in the Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey 28 June 1778. That winter, he reenlisted with the Continental Army, under the command of Captain Yates. Colonel John Hoskins Stone commanded this Regiment. Jacob states in his pension deposition that he stayed with this Army during the years 1779, 1780 and 1781, being promoted to the rank of Sergeant while serving with Captain Yates in 1779.

19 July 1781 General Washington’s Army was encamped at Dobbs Ferry, New York, on the Hudson River.9 It was here that Washington heard of Lord Cornwallis' encroachment at Yorktown, Virginia. Jacob Clark states that he was ill and remained at Dobbs Ferry when his Regiment moved out for the Siege of Yorktown. Later, partially recovered, he requested a map so that he could rejoin his Regiment in Virginia; however, a Captain instructed Jacob to wait and reassigned him to a scouting party of thirty to forty men who were following the movements of the enemy in New York.

Jacob, now in the company of this new detachment, marched to the east side of the Hudson River. On their third day out, they were surprised and captured by a party of British and Hessian soldiers. During that night Jacob escaped under the cover of darkness, but was re-taken three or four miles away, receiving a near mortal wound to his right side from an enemy bayonet. He was immediately transported to the notorious British prison ship, The Old Jersey10, anchored in Wallabout Bay, New York, where he was confined under horrific conditions until the end of the war. Upon his release, he returned to Baltimore, Maryland naked and destitute.

Shortly after the war, Jacob Clark and his brother James ventured in to the Indian Territory, now known as Jefferson County, Ohio, making them among the first pioneers into Ohio. They cleared land and built crude dwellings. In April of 1785 Congress forced all settlers out, often setting fire to their meager homes. 11 Negotiations were ongoing to purchase this land from the Indians, as the Ohio Territory was not yet open to settlement and the Congressional Petition labeled them “intruders”. Jacob and his brother returned to Maryland, settling in Cumberland to raise their families. Once grown, all of Jacob’s sons traveled west and settled in Pennsylvania and Ohio. Jacob and his wife, Tabitha also returned to make their home in Smithfield Township, Jefferson County Ohio. He filed for his military pension from here on 13 May 1833. Jacob Nicholls Clark died in 1841, at the age of 87.

Sons of Jacob N. Clark and Tabitha Dennis:

James Clark, 11 January 1786 to 26 July 1859, married Charlotte Alter
Jacob Clark, III, 29 May 1790, married Catherine Alter
John Dennis Clark, 09 April 1792 to 10 February 1885, married Teresa Jamieson
Hiram Clark, born 29 March 1795
Lemuel Clark, born 22 July 1797
Benjamin Clark, born 26 July 1799
Dennis Clark, 29 July 1801 to 12 July 1877, married Sarah Agnes Patterson
Daniel Clark, 11 June 1803 to 13 September 1885, married Mary Shaw
Thomas Clark, 19 Aug 1805 to 10 July 1858, married Mary Ann Wareham

Descendents who fought in the War of 1812:

John Dennis Clark (above). Served in Captain George Peters' Co., which was a part of the Washington DC Militia during the War of 1812 and received pension #SC-22527.12

Descendents who fought in the Mexican War of 1846-1848:

Charles Clark, son of James Clark, 25 May 1810 to 18 December 1877. Born in Cincinnati Ohio, served as Brigadier General, Commanding the 1st Division 1st Corps Army of the Mississippi.13

Jacob Lemuel Clark, son of Jacob Clark III, 17 March 1822 to 26 April 1862. Born in Ohio, served in Co. F 3rd Indiana, from Clifford Indiana.

Descendents who fought in the American Civil War:
Confederacy

Charles Clark, son of James Clark (above). Elected Civil War Governor of the State of Mississippi.

Charles Clark Farrar, grandson of James Clark, 19 October 1838 to 6 December 1905.14 Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, served with “Bolivar Troops” 1st Mississippi Cavalry15 and as Adjutant on General Charles Clark’s staff.

Descendents who fought in the American Civil War:
Union

Jacob Lemuel Clark, son of Jacob Clark III, (above). Served as Captain in the 18th Missouri Regiment. Died after injuries received at the battle of Shiloh, Tennessee.

George W. Clark, son of Thomas Clark, 29 April 1835 to 12 April 1896. Born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, served with 100th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Company G.16

Daniel B. Clark, son of Thomas Clark, 27 May 1841 to 22 February 1922. Born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, he died in Portland Oregon, served with 76th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers Company F. Rank Sergeant. Recruited in Blair County, PA, enlisted 8 November 1861 and discharged 7 November 1864.17

Andrew Jackson Clark, son of Thomas Clark, 28 May 1845 to 21 April 1910. Born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, served in Co. D 134th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Rank Private. Mustered in 10 August 1862 and out 26 May 1863 and also served in Battery "E", 1st Regiment Light Artillery, 43rd Volunteers from 16 January 1864 to 17 July 1865.18

Known living descendents of Jacob Nicholls Clark and Tabitha Dennis:

Mrs. Pat Alves Mrs. Sharon Flower
Mr. Donald Baughman Mrs. Dona Gordon
Mr. Francis Berry (USA - WWII) Mr. Charles Heflebower, Lt. Gen. USAF Retired
Mr. Geoffrey Ehnis-Clark, Esq. Mr. Charles Clark Jacobs, Jr., Esq. (USMC - WWII)
Mr. Benjamin Palmer Clark Mr. Calvin Johnson
Mr. Leonard Clark Mrs. Kay Kopycinski
Ms. Wilma Clark Mr. Charles Lansdale (US Navy - WWII)
Ms. Lelia Gilchrist Mrs. Leigh Lechel
Mr. Robert Gilchrist Mrs. Clara Robertson
Mr. Robert Coryea Mrs. Madel Jacobs Stringer
Mrs. Wanda Costello
Mrs. Elaine Crane
Mrs. Margaret “Meta” Cronia
Mrs. Bonnie Dassing
Mrs. Betty Duke

JACOB CLARK THE PATRIOT

Armed Forces Day is a day for the United States of America to pay tribute to the brave men and women, in all branches of the military, who protect us and fight for our freedom. One day of reverence hardly seems adequate for all their accomplishments.  I am proud to pay tribute to all of my ancestors who fought for our freedom and independence, but especially to the progenitor of my Clark family who fought in our country’s first battle for independence, the Revolutionary War.

Jacob Nicholls Clark was born 13 October 1754.   In January of 1776, from Baltimore Maryland, Jacob enlisted in the Continental Army and served under Captain Samuel Smith in the First Regiment of the Maryland Line, which was commanded by Colonel William Smallwood.   In Jacob’s pension deposition, he details the battles in which he fought, the wounds he received, his capture, escape and eventual re-capture, as well as his time spent aboard the infamous British prison ship, The Old Jersey, which was anchored in Wallabout Bay, New York until the end of the war.

We have all read about these historic events that formed the nucleus of our Nation and our freedom; our ancestor, Jacob Clark, personally experienced many of these monumental events.

Jacob Clark fought with The First Maryland at White Plains, NY on 28 October 1776, and at Fort Washington NY on 16 November 1776 and again at Fort Lee, New Jersey on 20 November 1776.

Jacob was with General George Washington on 25 December 1776 when the troops crossed the treacherous ice-swollen Delaware River about 9 miles north of Trenton, New Jersey.  At this point in the war, a significant number of these men marched through the snow in ragged uniforms and many without shoes. Raging winds combined with snow, sleet and rain on the night of December 25 was but one of many hardships endured by these brave soldiers throughout our country’s first battle for independence.  Remarkably, the following day, they fought once more and were victorious at the Battle of Trenton, New Jersey.

In one of the largest and bloodiest battles of the war, Jacob Clark fought at Brandywine, PA on 11 September 1777 and six days later rode with Washington’s Army to the Warwick Furnace, in Chester County PA. Their mission was to replenish the rain damaged ammunition.  This is where Jacob would first meet his future wife, Miss Tabitha Dennis, daughter of the furnace accountant.

On 4 October 1777, Jacob was engaged in battle at Germantown, PA and often told his children and grandchildren, how “he raised his rifle, taking aim at one of the British” when suddenly a musket ball penetrated his head rendering him immediately unconscious.  In a crude field hospital, a trepanning operation was performed to remove the ball and a portion of his crushed skull.  Forever after he wore a metal plate over this wound, held in place by a scarf tied around his head.

Jacob spent the rest of that winter recuperating at Valley Forge.  He often told his family how he would hear General Washington praying to the Almighty to deliver his troops from their enemies.

When Jacob had sufficiently recovered, he worked as a Recruiting Agent until the spring of 1778.  28 June 1778, Jacob was engaged at the Battle of Monmouth County Court House in Freehold, New Jersey. That winter, he re-enlisted with the Continental Army, under the command of Captain Yates.   Colonel John Hoskins Stone commanded this Regiment.  Jacob states in his pension deposition that he stayed with this division of the Army from 1779 thru 1781.  In 1779, Jacob achieved the rank of Sergeant while serving with Captain Yates. 

In July 1781 General Washington’s Army was encamped at Dobbs Ferry, New York.  Jacob Clark fell ill and remained at Dobbs Ferry when his Regiment moved on to the Siege of Yorktown. Later, while only partially recovered, he requested a map so that he could rejoin his Regiment in Virginia; however, a Captain instructed Jacob to wait and reassigned him to a scouting party of thirty to forty men who were following the movements of the enemy in New York. 

Jacob N. Clark, now in the company of his new detachment, marched to the east side of the Hudson River.  On the third day out, they were surprised and captured by a party of British and Hessian soldiers. During the night, Jacob escaped under the cover of darkness, but was re-captured three or four miles away, receiving a near mortal wound to his right side from an enemy bayonet.  He was immediately transported to the notorious British prison ship, The Old Jersey where he was confined until the end of the war.  The conditions of his imprisonment were deplorable and few Americans survived.  Jacob was discharged and released in Baltimore Maryland sometime between the signing of the Peace Treaty of Paris on 15 April 1783 and 25 November when the last of the British troops evacuated New York. 

Shortly after the war, Jacob Clark and his brother James ventured in to the Indian Territory, now known as Jefferson County, Ohio.  They cleared land and built crude dwellings. In April of 1785 Congress forced all settlers out, often setting fire to their meager homes.  Negotiations were ongoing to purchase this land from the Indians, as the Ohio Territory was not yet open to settlement.  After raising his family in Cumberland, Maryland, Jacob returned again to make his home in Ohio, and died here in 1841 at the age of 87.

Jacob had a profound respect for his country and instilled the same patriotism in his children.  One son was a founding citizen of Washington D.C. and fought in the War of 1812.  Two of Jacob’s grandsons fought in the Mexican War, and six grandsons fought on both sides during the Civil War.  One of these grandsons was the Confederate Brigadier General Charles Clark, who was elected as the Civil War Governor of Mississippi.

Jacob was a remarkable man who led a remarkable life.  As descendents we are grateful to have him honored at this ceremony for his service to our country.  We are sincerely appreciative for the dedication, hard work, and many hours that were spent to make this event possible.  We hope that all of you will accept our heartfelt gratitude.  Thank you and May God Bless Our Troops. 

Today as we gather under the shadow of yet another war we all hope and wish to be the last. I would like to close with this poem published in the Atlantic Monthly, a Civil War Publication from November 1, 1864; the author is unknown.  It is entitled The Last Rally.

Rally! Rally! Rally!
Arouse the slumbering land!
Rally! Rally! From mountain and valley,
And up from the ocean-strand!
Ye sons of the West, America's best!
New Hampshire's men of might!
From prairie and crag unfurl the flag,
And rally to the fight!

Armies of untried heroes,
Disguised in craftsman and clerk!
Ye men of the coast, invincible host!
Come, every one, to the work, —
From the fisherman gray as the salt-sea spray
That on Long Island breaks,
To the youth who tills the uttermost hills
By the blue northwestern lakes!

And ye Freedmen! Rally, Rally
To the banners of the North!
Through the shattered door of bondage pour
Your swarthy legions forth!
Kentuckians! Ye of Tennessee
Who scorned the despot's sway!
To all, to all, the bugle-call
Of Freedom sounds to-day!

Old men shall fight with the ballot,
Weapon the last and best, —
And the bayonet, with blood red-wet,
Shall write the will of the rest;
And the boys shall fill men's places,
And the little maiden rock
Her doll as she sits with her grandma and knits
An unknown hero's sock.

And the hearts of heroic mothers,
And the deeds of noble wives,
With their power to bless shall aid no less
Than the brave who give their lives.
The rich their gold shall bring, and the old
Shall help us with their prayers;
While hovering hosts of pallid ghosts
Attend us unawares.

From the ghastly fields of Shiloh
Muster the phantom bands,
From Virginia's swamps, and Death's white camps
On Carolina sands;
From Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg,
I see them gathering fast;
And up from Manassas, what is it that passes
Like thin clouds in the blast?

From the Wilderness, where blanches
The nameless skeleton;
From Vicksburg's slaughter and red-streaked water,
And the trenches of Donelson;
From the cruel, cruel prisons,
Where their bodies pined away,
From groaning decks, from sunken wrecks,
They gather with us to-day.

And they say to us, “Rally! Rally!
The work is almost done!
Ye harvesters, sally from mountain and valley
And reap the fields we won!
We sowed for endless years of peace,
We harrowed and watered well;
Our dying deeds were the scattered seeds:
Shall they perish where they fell?”

And their brothers, left behind them
In the deadly roar and clash
Of cannon and sword, by fort and ford,
And the carbine's quivering flash, —
Before the Rebel citadel
Just trembling to its fall,
From Georgia's glens, from Florida's fens,
For us they call, they call!

The life-blood of the tyrant
Is ebbing fast away;
Victory waits at her opening gates,
And smiles on our array;
With solemn eyes the Centuries
Before us watching stand,
And Love lets down his starry crown
To bless the future land.

One more sublime endeavor,
And behold the dawn of Peace!
One more endeavor, and war forever
Throughout the land shall cease!
For ever and ever the vanquished power
Of Slavery shall be slain,
And Freedom's stained and trampled flower
Shall blossom white again!

Then Rally! Rally! Rally!
Make tumult in the land!
Ye foresters, rally from mountain and valley!
Ye fishermen, from the strand!
Brave sons of the West, America's best!
New England's men of might!
From prairie and crag unfurl the flag,
And rally to the fight!


Submitted by chapter member Wilma  Clark
August 28, 2007 
Updates on Jacob Clark

I have, in my possession, an old family genealogy, researched by Lilian G. Polk (18 Jun 1901 - 18 Feb 1984), who writes that Jacob Clark died in Smithfield, Jefferson Co., Ohio in 1841 (Pittsburgh Junction).  The same notebook states that his wife Tabitha Dennis Clark died in 1844 at the home of their son, John D. Clark, in Washington D.C.  This information came from a letter written by Jacob's grandson, John T.C. Clark, in 1882, and earlier this year, I was able to obtain a newspaper article from the Baltimore Sun, stating her obituary as "Tabitha Clark, died 03 Jul 1843, at the home of her son, John D. Clark, Washington D.C."  This obituary had been previously undiscovered by the early family genealogy researchers, but certainly proves what had been written by the grandchildren in the mid to late 1800's as being very accurate.

"Master of Doro, an Epic of the Old South" by Annie Clark Jacobs and “Reminiscences of a Mississippian in Peace and War”, by Col. Frank Alexander Montgomery are two published books that both refer to Jacob in the Revolutionary War, enlisting from Maryland, and later moving the family into Ohio.

In the publication “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Jefferson County, Ohio” by Charles F. Green, published March 4, 1999 it lists "Jacob Clark born 1754, served in Maryland Continental Line."

The History of Noble County Ohio, L. H. Watkins, 1877, in the chapter entitled, Territorial Government and Public Lands ,Page 49 ,
It talks about early settlers in Ohio, and specifically mentions Jefferson Co. Ohio. On June 15, 1785, Congress circulated a petition to get these settlers out of the territory and also discourage new settlers from coming until the land was surveyed, etc..  It lists the "Intruders" and on the list is our Jacob Clark and his brother James Clark.

"The Pathfinders of Jefferson County" compiled by W. H. Hunter, published in the History of Ohio, Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Vol 6, page137, also states that both Jacob Clark and his brother James were early settlers of Jefferson Co., Ohio, true Ohio Pioneers. 

Other early researchersof the Jacob Clark family were Madel Jacobs Stringer, Francis Irwin Berry, James Bellarts and Stella Farrar Langdon.  Last year, I took over much of their early research, and have added to it considerably.  I have also gathered about 20 living descendants, from all over the US, and we have formed an family information email group. 


Compiled by Kitty Kutchmark and Flora L. VerStraten
Also includes Civil War Veterans - Descendants

Click to read Jacob Clark Dedication

Pension File – Jacob Clark Sr., Md. Letter to Mrs. J.D. Sugg, dated April 13, 1930. Dear Madam: Reference is made to your letter relative to Jacob Clark, a soldier of the Revolutionary War. The data contained herein were obtained from the papers on file in the Revolutionary War claim for pension, S.15389, based upon the military service of Jacob N. Cark in that war.

Jacob N. Clark, the name is also shown as Clarke, was born October 13, 1754, place and the name of his parents are not stated.

Jacob N. Clark enlisted in Baltimore, Maryland, in January 1776, and served as private in Captain Samuel Smith’s Company Colonel Smallwood’s Maryland Regiment, and as sergeant in Captain Yates’ Company, Colonel Stone’s Maryland Regiment. He was in the battles of Long Island, Fort Washington, Trenton, Brandywine, Germantown, where he received a wound in his forehead by a musket ball, and Monmouth. In 1781 he was taken prisoner by the British and Hessians, he attempted to escape the same night, but was taken and received a wound in his right side by a bayonet, was then conveyed to New York City, confined on the prison ship where he remained until the close of the war.

He was allowed pension on his application executed May 13, 1833, at which time he was a resident of Smithfield, Jefferson County, Ohio.

There are no family data. Very truly yours, A.D. Hiller, note – date of death on file.
NOTE – his grandson shows his death date as 1841 in Ohio.

Wilma Clark, a descendant of Jacob Clark, submitted the following information. Wilma has an extensive file on Jacob. If you would like to contact her about this file, you can email her at wilmaclark@embarqmail.com
Jacob Clark eventually returned to Ohio and filed for his Revolutionary War Pension on May 13, 1833 from his residency in Smithfield Township, Jefferson County, Ohio. Jacob Nicholls Clark died in 1841, at the age of 87. Sons of Jacob N. Clark and Tabitha Dennis (copied from family records belonging to the grandson of the youngest son, Thomas Jefferson Clark):

  1. James – born 11 Jan 1786 Maryland - died 26 Jul 1859, Fayette, Jackson, Mississippi. (He married Charlotte Alter and they are both buried in Fayette City Cemetery, Fayette Mississippi)
  2. Nancy – born 15 Jun 1788, Maryland. Family records indicate that she died young.
  3. Jacob Lemuel III – 29 May 1790, Maryland. (He married Catherine Alter)
  4. John Dennis – born 9 Apr 1792, Maryland – 10 Feb 1885, Washington D.C.
    (He married Teresa Jamieson and they are buried at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Washington DC)
  5. Hiram – born 29 Mar 1795, Maryland
  6. Lemuel – born 22 Jul 1797, Maryland
  7. Benjamin – born 26 Jul 1799, Maryland
  8. Dennis – born 29 Jul 1801, Maryland (Died 12 July 1877. He married Sarah Agnes Patterson and they are buried in St. Patrick Cemetery, Newry, PA)
  9. Daniel – born 11 Jun 1803, Maryland, died 13 Sep 1885. (He married Mary Shaw and they are buried in St. Patrick Cemetery, Newry, PA)
  10. Thomas – born 19 Aug 1804, Maryland, died 10 Jul 1858, in Virginia, possibly Wood County, now in West Virginia. (He married Mary Ann Wareham)

Descendants who fought in the War of 1812:

  • John Dennis Clark – Served in Captain George Peters’ Co., which was a part of the Washington DC Militia during the War of 1812 and received pension #SC-22527.

Descendants who fought in the Mexican War 1846 – 1848:

  • Charles Clark – son of James Clark, 25 May 1810. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, served as Brigadier General, commanding the 1st Division 1st Corps Army of the Mississippi.

  • Jacob Lemuel Clark – son of Jacob Clark III, 17 Mar 1822, born in Ohio, served in Co. F 3rd Indiana, from Clifford, Indiana.

 

Descendants who fought in the Civil War, confederacy:
• Charles Clark - son of James Clark (above). Elected Civil War Governor of the State of Mississippi.
• Charles Clark Farrar – grandson of James Clark, 19 Oct. 1838, born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Served with “Bolivar Troops” 1st Mississippi Cavalry and as Adjutant on General Charles Clark’s staff.

Descendants who fought in the Civil War, Union:

• Jacob Lemuel Clark – son of Jacob Clark III. Served as Captain in the 18th Missouri Regiment.
• George W. Clark – son of Thomas Clark, 29 Apr 1835, born in Lawrence Co., PA, served with 100th Regiment, PA Volunteers, Co. G.
• Daniel B. Clark – son of Thomas Clark, 27 May 1841, born in Lawrence Co., PA. He died in Portland, Oregon.
• Andrew Jackson Clark – son of Thomas Clark, 28 May 1845, born in Lawrence Co., PA. Served in Co. D 134th Regiment PA Volunteers, rank private.
Submitted by – Wilma Clark, 2030 Dalton Ave., Deltona, FL 32725 –wilmaclark@embarqmail.com, editor, Kay Kopycinski.


Glimpses of life on a cotton plantation before the war between the states – by Mrs. Annie E. Clark Jacobs – Among the early colonists of the territory called Maryland was my first American ancestor, an aunt of mine, who lived in Washington D.C. in a house built by her grandfather before the Revolutionary War. She has told me that she picked whortleberries on Capital Hill. My great-grandfather, Jacob Clark, was wounded in the Battle of Cowpens, had to undergo a trephining operation, and wear a bandage over his skull, permanently. He was present at the surrender of the British forces at Yorktown by Cornwallis, and the following story has been handed down in the family.

The combined American and French army was drawn up in two lines more than a mile in length…Washington, attended by his staff, was in front of the Americans, and Rochambeau and his staff in front of the French. The British were to pass between this double line to stack their arms at a designated place and were led by General O’Hara on horseback, instead of Cornwallis, who was eagerly expected. Jacob Clark was the first to perceive the substitution, occasioned by Cornwallis being too proud to deliver his sword personally, and cried out, “No corn – all shucks.” Immediately all the line took up the yell, “Oh shucks,” thus immortalizing a by-word.

The History of Noble County, Ohio –by L.H. Watkins, 1877 titled, Territorial Government and Public Lands, pg. 49 – It talks about early settlers in Ohio as early as pre-Revolutionary, and specifically mentions Jefferson Co., Ohio. On June 15, 1785, Congress circulated a petition to get these settlers out of the territory and also discharge new settlers from coming until the land was surveyed. It lists the “intruders” and there is a Jacob and James Clark on the list.
The Clark family, in Maryland, lived in close proximity to the Cresap family, (also James Clark’s grandson married a Cresap descendant). Michael Cresap was affiliated with the Ohio Company, who were encouraging early settlements in Ohio at the time and it would make sense that Jacob Clark and his brother James would be among these early settlers.

Jacob may have been traveling when he died, either arriving or departing while at Pittsburgh Junction (near Hopedale, Ohio). This was likely the main mail route into Pittsburgh at the time before railroad travel. He was quite a traveler, often traveling between Maryland and Ohio, always on foot, as documented by his grandchildren in letters written in the 1800’s, so it doesn’t surprise me that he probably died traveling. From Aunt Lillian Polk, who kept a genealogy notebook in the early 1900’s, stated that Jacob Clark died in Pittsburgh Junction, Jefferson County, Ohio.
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In an old family genealogy researched by Lilian G. Polk (18 Jun 1901 - 18 Feb 1984), she writes that Jacob Clark died in Smithfield, Jefferson Co., Ohio in 1841 (Pittsburgh Junction). The same notebook states that his wife Tabitha Dennis Clark died in 1844 at the home of their son, John D. Clark, in Washington D.C. This information came from a letter written by Jacob's grandson, John T.C. Clark, in 1882, and earlier this year, I was able to obtain a newspaper article from the Baltimore Sun, stating her obituary as "Tabitha Clark, died 03 Jul 1843, at the home of her son, John D. Clark, Washington D.C." This obituary had been previously undiscovered by the early family genealogy researchers, but certainly proves what had been written by the grandchildren in the mid to late 1800's as being very accurate family information.

"Master of Doro, an Epic of the Old South" by Annie Clark Jacobs and “Reminiscences of a Mississippian in Peace and War”, by Col. Frank Alexander Montgomery are two published books that both refer to Jacob in the Revolutionary War, enlisting from Maryland, and later moving the family into Ohio.

In the publication “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Jefferson County, Ohio” by Charles F. Green, published March 4, 1999 it lists "Jacob Clark born 1754, served in Maryland Continental Line."

The History of Noble County Ohio, L. H. Watkins, 1877, in the chapter entitled, Territorial Government and Public Lands, Page 49, it talks about early settlers in Ohio, and specifically mentions Jefferson Co. Ohio. On June 15, 1785, Congress circulated a petition to get these settlers out of the territory and also discourage new settlers from coming until the land was surveyed, etc. It lists the "Intruders" and on the list is our Jacob Clark and his brother James Clark.

"The Pathfinders of Jefferson County" compiled by W. H. Hunter, published in the History of Ohio, Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Vol. 6, page 137, also states that both Jacob Clark and his brother James were early settlers of Jefferson Co., Ohio, and true Ohio Pioneers.

Other early researchers of the Jacob Clark family were Madel Jacobs Stringer, Francis Irwin Berry, James Bellarts and Stella Farrar Langdon. Last year, I took over much of their early research, and have added to it considerably especially by researching the entire Washington D.C. line of John Dennis Clark, third son of Jacob Clark. To date, I have also gathered about 20 living descendants, from all over the US, and we have formed a family information email group.

Submitted by chapter member, Wilma Clark
2007
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SAR Graveside dedication held May 17, 2008
REHOBOTH PIONEER CEMETERY

Bronze marker for Jacob Clark was installed by the SAR, Ebenezer Zane Chapter, St. Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio

Remarks on behalf of the Clark family were read by Chapter President, Flora L. VerStraten as requested by Wilma Clark

[Service also held for Joseph Chambers on May 17, 2008, same location]
The following was written and compiled by Wilma J. Clark
wilmaclark@embarqmail.com

Jacob Nicholls Clark - Revolutionary War Soldier
When the Revolutionary War began, the Americans did not have a professional army or navy. Each colony provided for its own defenses through the use of local militia. 14 June 1775, Congress voted to appoint Congressman George Washington, of Virginia, as commanding general of the colonial forces, organizing the Continental Army.
Jacob Nicholls Clark, born 13 October 1754, followed his brother James Clark into military service in the Revolutionary War in January of 1776. James enlisted from Baltimore, Maryland in 1775, and Jacob enlisted there also, under Captain Samuel Smith in the First Regiment of the Maryland Line, which was commanded by Colonel William Smallwood.1

Jacob’s Regiment marched from Baltimore, through Pennsylvania and New Jersey to American Army Headquarters in New York City. 27 August 1776 he fought in the Battle of Long Island, which was commanded by Lord Sterling, and then retreated with the troops to Fort Washington, York Island, New York.

The British and Hessians attacked Fort Washington 16 November 1776, overpowering the Continental Army, and forcing a surrender of Fort Washington to the Hessians. Jacob and other surviving American soldiers fled across the Hudson River to Fort Lee, New Jersey, only to find that Fort Lee had also been captured 20 November 1776.
After these defeats, the Continental Army was exhausted, demoralized and uncertain of its future. It was a cold winter and many of the soldiers were now walking barefoot in the snow, leaving trails of blood. Believing that the need to raise the hopes and spirits of the troops and people was imperative, General George Washington, Commander in Chief, ordered a massive surprise attack on the Hessian held city of Trenton, New Jersey.

Jacob Clark was with General George Washington on 25 December 1776 when the troops crossed the treacherous ice-swollen Delaware River about 9 miles north of Trenton, New Jersey. Raging winds combined with snow, sleet and rain on the night of December 25 was but one of many hardships endured by these brave soldiers throughout our country’s first battle for independence. Remarkably, the following day, Colonel Smallwood’s First Maryland Regiment marched into the Battle of Trenton under the command of Major General Nathaniel Greene, 26 December 1776,2 and Jacob was once again engaged in battle. Trenton was declared a victory for the Continental Army when the Hessians surrendered the city.

Jacob now entered into what became known as the Philadelphia Campaign of 1777, a turning point in the American Revolution. The British won all the major battles, yet they were unable to suppress the rebellion. This Campaign began with the landing of the enemy at Head of Elk, Maryland and ended with Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The British plan was to seize the then capital city of Philadelphia. 25 August 1777 a 265-ship armada, under the command of General William Howe, arrived at Head of Elk with 13,000 British and 5,000 Hessian troops.3 Generals Washington, Greene and LaFayette viewed the troops disembarking from their vantage point on Iron Hill, which overlooked the Head of Elk. Jacob was assigned to guard the baggage train and although he was not engaged in battle, he participated in the orderly retreat into Chester County, Pennsylvania when it was determined that the Continental Army was significantly out-numbered and that victory was unattainable.

General Washington rapidly moved his troops between General Howe’s Army and the city of Philadelphia and prepared to fight what would be one of the largest and bloodiest battles in the war. By the night of September 10th, the American troops were extended along a six-mile line on the east side of Brandywine Creek. Washington knew that the British army would have to cross the creek here in order to advance to Philadelphia. The Battle of Brandywine was fought 11 September 1777, and while the Continental Army fought valiantly, the British attack was overwhelming, and the Americans were forced to retreat once again.

After their defeat at the Battle of Brandywine, the Continental Army in order to regroup, marched about 10 miles north of Brandywine and set up camp. When General Howe learned of their position, he moved his troops toward them in order to encounter a second skirmish with the Americans. 16 September 1777 General Washington and General Howe, waited on opposite sides of the valley to engage in battle, but before a shot was fired, a tremendous cloudburst with torrential downpours of rain, forced both armies to leave the field and wait to fight another day.

The cartridges and powder of the Continental Army were completely ruined leaving them in a precarious position. For safety, and to replenish ammunition, General Washington ordered all of his troops to the Warwick Furnace, an early ironworks community located in Chester County, Pennsylvania 17 September 1777.4 Here, Jacob N. Clark met his future wife, Tabitha Dennis, the daughter of accountant, John Dennis, who worked for the Warwick Furnace. 5

Jacob marched on toward Philadelphia as part of an exhausted Army and their next encounter was the Battle of Germantown. 4 October 1777, Jacob raised his rifle in battle, aimed, “taking sight of one of those poor fellows in the British service.” 6 However, before he could fire, Jacob was himself struck in the forehead by a spent musket ball. The ball penetrated his skull, entering just above his right eye. The Continental Army retreated back to Perkiomen Creek, traveling through Flourtown, Pennsylvania, taking their wounded into the Episcopalian Church, used as their hospital.7 It was likely here, that an army surgeon performed the trepanning operation to remove the crushed portion of his skull. A silver plate was then inserted over the wound, and Jacob forever after wore a scarf around his head to protect his injury.

In his pension deposition, Jacob states that afterwards he was at the Perkiomen Creek encampment at Pennypacker’s Mills, just outside Germantown. Today a stone marker commemorates Washington’s encampment here and reads as follows:

THIS STONE MARKS THE CAMP OF WASHINGTON’S ARMY, PENNYPACKER’S MILLS. SEPT. 26-29 & OCT. 5-8, 1777
Historical Society of Montgomery Co., PA 8 Oct. 1897.

Also in his deposition, Jacob states that he remained under the command of General George Washington and was with his army during the winter of 1777. Washington’s troops were secluded at Valley Forge, an ironworks owned by Isaac Potts, and located fifteen miles south east of the Warwick Furnace, which was owned by his father, John Potts. Jacob’s name is not included on the Muster Roll at Valley Forge, which can be explained by the fact that General William Smallwood’s troops were, at this time, ordered to Wilmington, Delaware to protect against enemy movements in the Delaware Bay. Jacob would have been recovering from his critical head injury and likely would not have been moved out with them. He was still technically under the command of General Smallwood and therefore would not have been listed as a soldier on the roll with their regiment, as Smallwood’s army did not remain at Valley Forge. Family letters, between the grandchildren, state that Jacob often told his family of hearing General Washington go out each morning during that cold winter at Valley Forge “praying to the Almighty to deliver them from their enemies.” 8

After Jacob recovered, he was placed in the company of Lieutenant Jacob Norris to act as a recruiting agent for the Army traveling into Hampton County Maryland. In the spring of 1778, General Washington vehemently opposed British Prime Minister, Frederick Lord North’s, new proposal to negotiate peace with the Americans and all recruiting parties were then summoned back to Germantown, Pennsylvania to organize their next maneuvers against the enemy.
Upon his return, Jacob engaged in the Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey 28 June 1778. That winter, he reenlisted with the Continental Army, under the command of Captain Yates. Colonel John Hoskins Stone commanded this Regiment. Jacob states in his pension deposition that he stayed with this Army during the years 1779, 1780 and 1781, being promoted to the rank of Sergeant while serving with Captain Yates in 1779.

19 July 1781 General Washington’s Army was encamped at Dobbs Ferry, New York, on the Hudson River.9 It was here that Washington heard of Lord Cornwallis' encroachment at Yorktown, Virginia. Jacob Clark states that he was ill and remained at Dobbs Ferry when his Regiment moved out for the Siege of Yorktown. Later, partially recovered, he requested a map so that he could rejoin his Regiment in Virginia; however, a Captain instructed Jacob to wait and reassigned him to a scouting party of thirty to forty men who were following the movements of the enemy in New York.

Jacob, now in the company of this new detachment, marched to the east side of the Hudson River. On their third day out, they were surprised and captured by a party of British and Hessian soldiers. During that night Jacob escaped under the cover of darkness, but was re-taken three or four miles away, receiving a near mortal wound to his right side from an enemy bayonet. He was immediately transported to the notorious British prison ship, The Old Jersey 10, anchored in Wallabout Bay, New York, where he was confined under horrific conditions until the end of the war. Upon his release, he returned to Baltimore, Maryland naked and destitute.

Shortly after the war, Jacob Clark and his brother James ventured in to the Indian Territory, now known as Jefferson County, Ohio, making them among the first pioneers into Ohio. They cleared land and built crude dwellings. In April of 1785 Congress forced all settlers out, often setting fire to their meager homes. 11 Negotiations were ongoing to purchase this land from the Indians, as the Ohio Territory was not yet open to settlement and the Congressional Petition labeled them “intruders”. Jacob and his brother returned to Maryland, settling in Cumberland to raise their families. Once grown, all of Jacob’s sons traveled west and settled in Pennsylvania and Ohio. Jacob and his wife, Tabitha also returned to make their home in Smithfield Township, Jefferson County Ohio. He filed for his military pension from here on 13 May 1833. Jacob Nicholls Clark died in 1841, at the age of 87.

Sons of Jacob N. Clark and Tabitha Dennis:
James Clark, 11 January 1786 to 26 July 1859, married Charlotte Alter
Jacob Clark, III, 29 May 1790, married Catherine Alter
John Dennis Clark, 09 April 1792 to 10 February 1885, married Teresa Jamieson
Hiram Clark, born 29 March 1795
Lemuel Clark, born 22 July 1797
Benjamin Clark, born 26 July 1799
Dennis Clark, 29 July 1801 to 12 July 1877, married Sarah Agnes Patterson
Daniel Clark, 11 June 1803 to 13 September 1885, married Mary Shaw
Thomas Clark, 19 Aug 1805 to 10 July 1858, married Mary Ann Wareham
Descendents who fought in the War of 1812:
John Dennis Clark (above). Served in Captain George Peters' Co., which was a part of the Washington DC Militia during the War of 1812 and received pension #SC-22527.12
Descendents who fought in the Mexican War of 1846-1848:
Charles Clark, son of James Clark, 25 May 1810 to 18 December 1877. Born in Cincinnati Ohio, served as Brigadier General, Commanding the 1st Division 1st Corps Army of the Mississippi.13
Jacob Lemuel Clark, son of Jacob Clark III, 17 March 1822 to 26 April 1862. Born in Ohio, served in Co. F 3rd Indiana, from Clifford Indiana.
Descendents who fought in the American Civil War:
Confederacy
Charles Clark, son of James Clark (above). Elected Civil War Governor of the State of Mississippi.
Charles Clark Farrar, grandson of James Clark, 19 October 1838 to 6 December 1905.14 Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, served with “Bolivar Troops” 1st Mississippi Cavalry 15 and as Adjutant on General Charles Clark’s staff.
Descendents who fought in the American Civil War:
Union
Jacob Lemuel Clark, son of Jacob Clark III, (above). Served as Captain in the 18th Missouri Regiment. Died after injuries received at the battle of Shiloh, Tennessee.
George W. Clark, son of Thomas Clark, 29 April 1835 to 12 April 1896. Born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, served with 100th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Company G.16
Daniel B. Clark, son of Thomas Clark, 27 May 1841 to 22 February 1922. Born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, he died in Portland Oregon, served with 76th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers Company F. Rank Sergeant. Recruited in Blair County, PA, enlisted 8 November 1861 and discharged 7 November 1864.17
Andrew Jackson Clark, son of Thomas Clark, 28 May 1845 to 21 April 1910. Born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, served in Co. D 134th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Rank Private. Mustered in 10 August 1862 and out 26 May 1863 and also served in Battery "E", 1st Regiment Light Artillery, 43rd Volunteers from 16 January 1864 to 17 July 1865.18

Known living descendents [as of 2008] of Jacob Nicholls Clark and Tabitha Dennis:
Mrs. Pat Alves Mrs. Sharon Flower
Mr. Donald Baughman
Mrs. Dona Gordon
Mr. Francis Berry (USA - WWII)
Mr. Charles Heflebower, Lt. Gen. USAF Retired
Mr. Geoffrey Ehnis-Clark, Esq.
Mr. Charles Clark Jacobs, Jr., Esq. (USMC - WWII)
Mr. Benjamin Palmer Clark
Mr. Calvin Johnson
Mr. Leonard Clark
Mrs. Kay Kopycinski
Ms. Wilma Clark
Mr. Charles Lansdale (US Navy - WWII)
Ms. Lelia Gilchrist
Mrs. Leigh Lechel
Mr. Robert Gilchrist
Mrs. Clara Robertson
Mr. Robert Coryea
Mrs. Madel Jacobs Stringer
Mrs. Wanda Costello
Mrs. Elaine Crane
Mrs. Margaret “Meta” Cronia
Mrs. Bonnie Dassing
Mrs. Betty Duke

Above is a picture of Confederate General Charles Clark. He was also elected as Governor of Mississippi during the Civil War, serving from his inauguration on 16 November 1863, until his capture and imprisonment on 13 June 1865, at the end of the war. He was later pardoned by President Andrew Johnson on 12 October 1865. There still exist photos of his father James Clark; oldest son of Jacob Clark and many other photo's from this family line.
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More about Jacob Clark Rev. Veteran: (compiled and written by Wilma Clark)

Jacob Clark in Jefferson County in the "Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly", Volume 6, The Pathfinders of Jefferson County compiled by W. H. Hunter pg. 95 explaining the early settlers in Jefferson Co., OH. On page 137, it lists Jacob Clark and his brother James Clark as settlers who were 'put out' due to the Indian uprisings and that the area had not yet been properly surveyed. I believe these early pioneers thought they could lay claim to these lands after the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783 ending the Revolutionary War.

None of us know where Jacob Clark was born, but we believe it was Maryland. Some say England, but we do know he was of Scottish origin. We do not have a clue as to what his occupation was. His oldest son was a gunsmith and his youngest son was a chair maker. A middle son was a tinner, another a farmer, another a Justice & Police Judge Magistrate, and another was said to have had fishing boats in Michigan but this son’s line has not yet been documented.

I am very proud of our heritage, and all of us descendents feel it is long overdue for Jacob to be honored for his Revolutionary service, and are so happy to see that it is finally happening.
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Additional Information from Wilma Clark, direct descendant of Jacob Clark:

I would like to add that Jacob Clark was a remarkable man who led a remarkable life. Jacob had a profound respect for his country and instilled the same patriotism in his children. One son was a founding citizen of Washington D.C. and fought in the War of 1812. Two of Jacob’s grandsons fought in the Mexican War, and six grandsons fought on both sides during the Civil War. One of these grandsons was Confederate Brigadier General Charles Clark, who was elected as the Civil War Governor of Mississippi.

Many decades of research, letters, and journals from several generations went into my being able to complete a chronology and document the life of Jacob Clark, progenitor of our Clark lineage. When this torch was passed to me to light the way for future generations I contacted the Jefferson County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogy Society and the Ebenezer Zane Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution to help in obtaining the Bronze Marker from the Veterans Administration to honor this brave patriot. This marker will serve as a beacon to all generations who follow and give them the sense of pride in their forefathers’ heroic and patriotic efforts to maintain our countries freedoms.

Our sincere and heartfelt gratitude is extended for the many hours of work, dedication, and determination that each and every person within these organizations provided, especially Mrs. Flora VerStraten, President of the Jefferson County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogy Society and Mr. George E. Livingston, Historian and Genealogist for the Ebenezer Zane Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution.

Sincerely,
Wilma J. Clark
Deltona, Florida
Jacob Nicholls Clark - Revolutionary War Soldier


Some Highlights:
Jacob Clark born, 13 October 1754 fought the entire Revolutionary War, enlisting from Baltimore Maryland, January 1776 until he was captured in the summer of 1781 and held, wounded by a bayonet to his side, on the notorious prison ship, Old Jersey in Wallabout Bay, New York until the end of the war. As documented in letters written by his grandchildren, these men literally ate rats to survive.

Jacob Clark fought in the Battle of Long Island, NY 27 August 1776 and in the Battle of Fort Lee, New Jersey 20 November 1776.  He fought in the Battle of Trenton on 26 December 1776 when the Hessians finally surrendered the city back to the Americans.

25 August 1777, Jacob Clark guarded the baggage train on Iron Hill, at the Head of Elk, Maryland where Generals George Washington, Nathaniel Greene, and LaFayette watched the British troops disembark intending to capture the then Capital City of Philadelphia.

On 11 September 1777, Jacob was engaged in the bloodiest of all the wars, the Battle of Brandywine, in Pennsylvania.   British General Howe tried to engage the Americans in battle again on 16 September 1777, just ten miles from Brandywine Creek, but a torrential downpour of rain damaged all the ammunition and that second battle never occurred.

17 September 1777, General Washington ordered all of his troops to the Warwick Furnace, Chester County, PA to replenish their ammunition.  Jacob Clark met his future wife here, a daughter of John Dennis, Accountant & Clerk for the Warwick Furnace.

Jacob was shot in the forehead on 4 October 1777, at the Battle of Germantown, PA.  Army surgeons removed a portion of his crushed skull, and he forever after wore a metal plate over it, wrapped tight by a scarf.

Jacob Clark returned with his Company to their Perkiomen Creek encampment at Pennypacker’s Mills, just outside Germantown, Pa and remained there from October 5 through October 8, 1777.  With winter fast approaching, and food and clothing scarce, General Washington marched his bedraggled troops to Valley Forge and this is where Jacob Clark recovered from his head wound. 

After Jacob recovered sufficiently, he acted as a recruiting agent for the Army until the spring of 1778.  He was next engaged in the Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey, 28 June 1778.  He was promoted to Sergeant in 1779.

In July 1781, Jacob was encamped at Dobbs' Ferry, New York when his Regiment moved out for the Siege of Yorktown, Virginia.  Jacob was ill at the time, but when partially recovered, he requested a map to join the others, but was instructed by a Captain to join a local scouting party who were watching the movements of the enemy in New York. On the third day out with this new detachment, they were all captured.  Jacob escaped, but was recaptured and sustained a wound to his side from an enemy soldier's bayonet.

After his discharge, Jacob and his brother James ventured into the new frontier, the Ohio Territory.   They cleared and settled on land not yet declared safe from hostile Indians and in 1785; a Congressional petition forced them and several others from the area.

Jacob Clark, returned to Maryland, raised his family of nine sons, and eventually returned to Ohio to spend his remaining years.  He filed for his pension 13 May 1833 from his residence in Smithfield, Jefferson County, Ohio.  His family states he died in 1841, at the age of 87.

Jacob’s oldest son, James Clark had 11 children.  His oldest son, also James, married Jane August Soule, daughter of Bishop Joshua Soule, renowned for his early doctrine written for the Methodist Episcopal Church.  James, second son, was Mexican was veteran Brigadier General Charles Clark, later to become Civil War Governor of the state of Mississippi.

Jacob’s second son, Jacob Lemuel Clark, had a son, Jacob III, who fought in the Mexican War in Co. F 3rd Indiana, from Clifford Indiana and was later Captain of the 18th Missouri Infantry, was severely wounded at the Battle of Shiloh and died just days later.

Jacob’s third son, John Dennis Clark, born 09 Apr 1792, fought with Major George Peters’ Company, from Washington D.C. in the War of 1812.  He was in the same Company as Francis Scott Key.  John D. Clark became a Police Magistrate Judge and was an old and respected citizen in Washington D.C. for 74 years.

Jacob’s youngest son, Thomas had 9 children, three of whom fought in the Civil War from the state of Pennsylvania.  George Washington Clark enlisted from Lawrence County, PA into the 100th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Company G.; Daniel B. Clark enlisted from Blair Co., PA into the 76th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Company F.; Andrew Jackson Clark enlisted from Lawrence Co., Pa into Co. D, 134th Regiment, PA Volunteers and also in Battery E, 1st Light Artillery, 43rd Regiment Pennsylvania.

 

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